Wednesday, April 23, 2014
imaginaryprisons said: Because the majority of humans have better health outcomes when exposed to sunlight while they’re awake and not exposed to sunlight when they’re sleeping

Are you sure? I’ve heard of projects in Scandinavia and elsewhere regarding people whose natural sleep schedule has them being more efficient and overall healthy at later times. Google B-society to check those out.

So even if it’s a majority, the minority that are definitely not morning people is a fairly significant one. I’d also like to see what specific studies have been conducted regarding that, I’ve never actually looked.

Yeah I have no idea why humans continue to think setting their schedule according to the position of the sun makes sense, excluding activities that are optimized by the presence of sunlight. cl0pen being unusually wise in the morning.

stupidswampwitch:

masooood:

safeidgul:

Why can’t there be a male hooter’s equivalent where male servers are shirtless and highly sexualized for their bodies and looks

Male Strip clubs. You’re thinking of male strip clubs.

No. Not a male strip club. A strip club is a strip club. I want a place called Cahones where waiters wear Speedos and are forced to stuff if they don’t fill out their uniform well enough. I want them to giggle for my tips. I want it to be so normalised and engrained in our culture that women bring their daughters there for lunch (because whaaaaaat the wings are good! Geeze sensitive much?) where they’ll give playful little nudges like, “Wouldn’t mind if you dad had those. Heh heh heh.” that their daughters don’t even understand but will absorb and start to assume is just the normal way grown up women talk about grown up men. I want to playfully ask my waiter if I can have extra nuts on my salad and for him to swat my arm with an Oh, you because he knows if he doesn’t his manager will yell at him. I want other men to pretend to like going there so I think they’re cool. I want to go to Cahones during my lunch break at work and when I come back and tell the other women in the office where I went they chuckle slightly and the men around us suddenly feel self conscious and they don’t know why.

tigburr:

coolmathstuff:

allofthemath:

appliedmathemagics:

themathkid:

Can’t. Stop. Watching.

this is hypnotic…

Conic sections are all connected! A hyperbola is an anti circle, in this case.

Remember, the equation for a circle involves adding x squared and y squared, while the equation for a hyperbola involves subtracting one from the other. The other consequence of this is that is that if you extend the graph of either one to include imaginary and complex x or y values, a hyperbola contains a circle in its empty space, and a circle has a hyperbola surrounding it.

I FOUND THE MATHEMATICIANS!
FRIENDS! FRIENDS!!

tigburr:

coolmathstuff:

allofthemath:

appliedmathemagics:

themathkid:

Can’t. Stop. Watching.

this is hypnotic…

Conic sections are all connected! A hyperbola is an anti circle, in this case.

Remember, the equation for a circle involves adding x squared and y squared, while the equation for a hyperbola involves subtracting one from the other. The other consequence of this is that is that if you extend the graph of either one to include imaginary and complex x or y values, a hyperbola contains a circle in its empty space, and a circle has a hyperbola surrounding it.

I FOUND THE MATHEMATICIANS!

FRIENDS! FRIENDS!!

(Source: jamiedykes)

Tuesday, April 22, 2014
fatpinkcast:

Critics’ Reactions to the Jaime/Cersei Rape Scene in Episode 4.3 of Game of Thrones

"I wonder, then, if the rape was on some level a misguided attempt to give Cersei even more pathos, a la the convenient backstory rapes that have become depressingly common on prestige TV (and Scandal)…I wonder if TV Thrones‘s writers just have a tendency to change problematic book sex scenes into clear scenes of unconsensual sex.” - Hillary Busis, Entertainment Weekly


“Game of Thrones has a rape problem.” - Kevin Spak, Newser


"In the original depiction, Jaime never says “Why have the Gods made me love a hateful woman?” — a line that the TV show added in, which in context makes Jaime look like an abusive rapist (the gods made me do it!)”- Darren Franich, Entertainment Weekly


Jaime forced himself upon Cersei despite her demands to stop. “It’s not right,” she cried, to which Jaime snarled, “I don’t care.”…we can never unsee that godawful scene. - Leanne Aguilera, E! Online


"If this scene really just is a miscalculation in direction (and potentially the writing of Benioff and Weiss, neither of whom have yet commented on it) and doesn’t get any payoff later in the season, then it truly deserves all the criticism it has been receiving.” - Terri Schwartz, Zap2It


The director who shot the scene and the man who acted in it both believe it wasn’t necessarily nonconsensual sex— an attitude that isn’t totally surprising in a society that’s deeply confused about what constitutes consent, and that doesn’t always recognize sexual violence for what it is. -Tara Culp-Ressler, ThinkProgress


So then Jaime … well … no other way to put this, really. He rapes his sister beside their corpse of their murdered son. This is the same guy who protected Brienne from a similar fate last year.  - James Hibberd, Entertainment Weekly


"…the show’s overall treatment of women as disposable objects onto whom physical and emotional violence are relentlessly enacted. Sexual violence is so pervasive on the show that nearly every woman on the show has been raped or threatened with rape. The show, and the books, reveal the disturbing and cavalier facility with which rape becomes a narrative device.Rape is used to punish. Rape is used to make a woman more sympathetic or to explicate their anger or other unlikable qualities. Rape is used to put women in their place.” -Roxane Gay, Salon


"The entire scene in the sept was an exercise in Cersei’s belittlement. She watched her father degrade and dishonor (albeit truthfully) her firstborn’s legacy and then manipulate her youngest into serving as his marionette. Then, on the floor next to the body of her dead son, the only man she’s ever taken into her confidence abused that trust in the most vile way imaginable.” - Hillary Kelly, The New Republic


"A giggling dead body would have at least taken our attention away from, you know, the raping." - Johnny Brayson, wetpaint


"Whether the show meant it to come across that way or not, what we saw was a rape.” - Erik Kain, Forbes


"The scene, which has Cersei pleading “stop it” repeatedly and struggling against Jaime, appears far from consensual." - Margaret Wappler, Los Angeles Times


In the show there’s no other way to interpret it as unambiguous rape. Jaimie isn’t loving when he tries to have sex with her in the show, he’s shown as being angry and hateful, cursing her for being a wicked woman. There’s no point in the scene on the show that we can see Cersei consent, which makes the whole scene significantly different from the book. Some readers have pointed out that the rape in the show is damaging for Cersei’s character arc since she had to endure the marriage to Robert Baratheon in which he essentially engaged in marital rape,  Her consensual sex was always with Jaimie who made her feel safe. Jaimie raping her in the show completely destroys their relationship and destroys the trust she has in Jaimie leaving her without anyone. - AJ, the Digital Times


The rewritten scene also takes away all of Cersei’s agency. In the original text, Cersei chooses to have sex with Jaime, grotesque as it and the setting may be — because she wants to, or because she uses sex to manipulate, it doesn’t matter. Cersei has power and control. The scene in the show deprives her of all of that. - Amelia McDonell-Parry, The Frisky


His response is not to stop loving her, not to stop believing that he is victim to the gods. Instead, Jaime rapes his sister, passing that sense of unendurable pain on to her. He must know that this is the worst possible way that he could hurt her. Jaime knew that Robert raped Cersei, and in the novels, he wanted to kill Robert for it. Not only does raping Cersei remind his sister of her repeated, humiliating violation, Jaime is poisoning their own relationship, the thing that had been Cersei’s antidote to the miseries of her marriage. It is an exceptionally cruel thing for Jaime to do.  - Alyssa Rosenberg, Washington Post.


It’s hard to shake the idea that Game Of Thrones, the show, doesn’t see a problem with pushing a scene from complicated, consensual sex to outright rape. It would be easier to accept that idea if it were clear what the show was trying to do with those changes. - Sonia Saraiya, AV Club


If Graves intended to depict consensual sex in the end, he completely failed. This wasn’t even one of those terribly clichéd scenes where a man starts raping a woman only to find that she comes around to thinking it’s hot. Cersei is still kicking and protesting when the camera cuts away. It’s as straightforward a rape scene as you’ll get on TV, unless you buy the ridiculous myth that a woman can’t be raped if she’s consented to sex with a man before. - Amanda Marcotte, Slate


This isn’t the first rape scene in Game of Thrones—far from it. And there’s been controversy over the show’s use of rape before. But what makes this scene the most upsetting one yet is that the director didn’t realize he was filming a rape scene…Whether or not the creators intended this to be a rape scene is irrelevant; they made one anyway. And worse, they made one that encourages the most dangerous thinking about rape imaginable. - Laura Hudson, Wired


"How will victims of sexual assault be affected when a director and actor in one of television’s most popular shows questions whether no really means no?" - Eliana Dockterman, Time Magazine


I’ll go ahead and say it: Jaime Lannister has become a rape cliché. He’s the boss, like every other on-screen rapist we’ve ever seen. - Hayley Krischer, Salon


"I’m not opposed to shows depicting sexual violence, but rape-as-prop is always distressing…Rape and abuse have consequences for the victims who carry those traumas with them. While I don’t know exactly how the show will depict the aftermath of Jamie raping Cersei, GoT does not have a strong track record of acknowledging or exploring the lingering effects of surviving sexual assault." - Margarey Lyons, Vulture/New York Magazine


"I can’t think of any comparable defense for the rape scene in "Breaker of Chains," which feels like a naked and ill-conceived attempt to push Game of Thrones into even darker territory. …I’m concerned that Game of Thrones has made a mistake it can’t take back — and one that sets a troubling precedent for the show’s future.” - Scott Meslow, The Week


The Game of Thrones Rape Scene Was Unnecessary and Despicable….The fact that showrunners might be asking us to overlook this for the sake of character development is downright insulting and says a lot about how we treat victims, especially the ones who come off as unlikable. - Madeleine Davies, Jezebel.com


Is “Game of Thrones” Obsessed With Sexual Assault?…Frankly, there are some weeks when “Game of Thrones” doesn’t seem worth the effort.  - Sam Adams, IndieWire

fatpinkcast:

Critics’ Reactions to the Jaime/Cersei Rape Scene in Episode 4.3 of Game of Thrones

"I wonder, then, if the rape was on some level a misguided attempt to give Cersei even more pathos, a la the convenient backstory rapes that have become depressingly common on prestige TV (and Scandal)…I wonder if TV Thrones‘s writers just have a tendency to change problematic book sex scenes into clear scenes of unconsensual sex.” - Hillary Busis, Entertainment Weekly

Game of Thrones has a rape problem.” Kevin Spak, Newser

"In the original depiction, Jaime never says “Why have the Gods made me love a hateful woman?” — a line that the TV show added in, which in context makes Jaime look like an abusive rapist (the gods made me do it!)”- Darren Franich, Entertainment Weekly

Jaime forced himself upon Cersei despite her demands to stop. “It’s not right,” she cried, to which Jaime snarled, “I don’t care.”…we can never unsee that godawful scene. Leanne Aguilera, E! Online

"If this scene really just is a miscalculation in direction (and potentially the writing of Benioff and Weiss, neither of whom have yet commented on it) and doesn’t get any payoff later in the season, then it truly deserves all the criticism it has been receiving.” - Terri Schwartz, Zap2It

The director who shot the scene and the man who acted in it both believe it wasn’t necessarily nonconsensual sex— an attitude that isn’t totally surprising in a society that’s deeply confused about what constitutes consent, and that doesn’t always recognize sexual violence for what it is. -Tara Culp-Ressler, ThinkProgress

So then Jaime … well … no other way to put this, really. He rapes his sister beside their corpse of their murdered son. This is the same guy who protected Brienne from a similar fate last year.  - James Hibberd, Entertainment Weekly

"…the show’s overall treatment of women as disposable objects onto whom physical and emotional violence are relentlessly enacted. Sexual violence is so pervasive on the show that nearly every woman on the show has been raped or threatened with rape. The show, and the books, reveal the disturbing and cavalier facility with which rape becomes a narrative device.Rape is used to punish. Rape is used to make a woman more sympathetic or to explicate their anger or other unlikable qualities. Rape is used to put women in their place.” -Roxane Gay, Salon

"The entire scene in the sept was an exercise in Cersei’s belittlement. She watched her father degrade and dishonor (albeit truthfully) her firstborn’s legacy and then manipulate her youngest into serving as his marionette. Then, on the floor next to the body of her dead son, the only man she’s ever taken into her confidence abused that trust in the most vile way imaginable.” - Hillary Kelly, The New Republic

"A giggling dead body would have at least taken our attention away from, you know, the raping." - Johnny Brayson, wetpaint

"Whether the show meant it to come across that way or not, what we saw was a rape.” - Erik Kain, Forbes

"The scene, which has Cersei pleading “stop it” repeatedly and struggling against Jaime, appears far from consensual." - Margaret Wappler, Los Angeles Times

In the show there’s no other way to interpret it as unambiguous rape. Jaimie isn’t loving when he tries to have sex with her in the show, he’s shown as being angry and hateful, cursing her for being a wicked woman. There’s no point in the scene on the show that we can see Cersei consent, which makes the whole scene significantly different from the book. Some readers have pointed out that the rape in the show is damaging for Cersei’s character arc since she had to endure the marriage to Robert Baratheon in which he essentially engaged in marital rape,  Her consensual sex was always with Jaimie who made her feel safe. Jaimie raping her in the show completely destroys their relationship and destroys the trust she has in Jaimie leaving her without anyone. - AJ, the Digital Times

The rewritten scene also takes away all of Cersei’s agency. In the original text, Cersei chooses to have sex with Jaime, grotesque as it and the setting may be — because she wants to, or because she uses sex to manipulate, it doesn’t matter. Cersei has power and control. The scene in the show deprives her of all of that. - Amelia McDonell-Parry, The Frisky

His response is not to stop loving her, not to stop believing that he is victim to the gods. Instead, Jaime rapes his sister, passing that sense of unendurable pain on to her. He must know that this is the worst possible way that he could hurt her. Jaime knew that Robert raped Cersei, and in the novels, he wanted to kill Robert for it. Not only does raping Cersei remind his sister of her repeated, humiliating violation, Jaime is poisoning their own relationship, the thing that had been Cersei’s antidote to the miseries of her marriage. It is an exceptionally cruel thing for Jaime to do.  - Alyssa Rosenberg, Washington Post.

It’s hard to shake the idea that Game Of Thrones, the show, doesn’t see a problem with pushing a scene from complicated, consensual sex to outright rape. It would be easier to accept that idea if it were clear what the show was trying to do with those changes. - Sonia Saraiya, AV Club

If Graves intended to depict consensual sex in the end, he completely failed. This wasn’t even one of those terribly clichéd scenes where a man starts raping a woman only to find that she comes around to thinking it’s hot. Cersei is still kicking and protesting when the camera cuts away. It’s as straightforward a rape scene as you’ll get on TV, unless you buy the ridiculous myth that a woman can’t be raped if she’s consented to sex with a man before. - Amanda Marcotte, Slate

This isn’t the first rape scene in Game of Thrones—far from it. And there’s been controversy over the show’s use of rape before. But what makes this scene the most upsetting one yet is that the director didn’t realize he was filming a rape scene…Whether or not the creators intended this to be a rape scene is irrelevant; they made one anyway. And worse, they made one that encourages the most dangerous thinking about rape imaginable. - Laura Hudson, Wired

"How will victims of sexual assault be affected when a director and actor in one of television’s most popular shows questions whether no really means no?" - Eliana Dockterman, Time Magazine

I’ll go ahead and say it: Jaime Lannister has become a rape cliché. He’s the boss, like every other on-screen rapist we’ve ever seen. - Hayley Krischer, Salon

"I’m not opposed to shows depicting sexual violence, but rape-as-prop is always distressing…Rape and abuse have consequences for the victims who carry those traumas with them. While I don’t know exactly how the show will depict the aftermath of Jamie raping Cersei, GoT does not have a strong track record of acknowledging or exploring the lingering effects of surviving sexual assault." - Margarey Lyons, Vulture/New York Magazine

"I can’t think of any comparable defense for the rape scene in "Breaker of Chains," which feels like a naked and ill-conceived attempt to push Game of Thrones into even darker territory. …I’m concerned that Game of Thrones has made a mistake it can’t take back — and one that sets a troubling precedent for the show’s future.” - Scott Meslow, The Week

The Game of Thrones Rape Scene Was Unnecessary and Despicable….The fact that showrunners might be asking us to overlook this for the sake of character development is downright insulting and says a lot about how we treat victims, especially the ones who come off as unlikable. - Madeleine Davies, Jezebel.com

Is “Game of Thrones” Obsessed With Sexual Assault?…Frankly, there are some weeks when “Game of Thrones” doesn’t seem worth the effort.  - Sam Adams, IndieWire

Privilege 101?

teachthemhowtothink:

I’ve seen numerous posts about privilege on my dash lately and there seems to have been a communication problem.  

This is super obvious, but I feel like I need to point out most of us have advantages in some areas and disadvantages in others.  When you see a post about a privilege you have but think “Hey - I’m not privileged because <this>”, you’re actually recognizing the <this> privilege of others (Which is good!  It’s a first step!), but you’re forgetting about your own privileges.

For example, I’m a straight (societal advantage), white (societal advantage), financially secure (societal advantage), atheist (societal disadvantage), married (societal advantage) woman (societal disadvantage) and I occasionally struggle with depression (societal disadvantage).  

In discussions about a topic where I have a societal advantage, I need to remember to A) shut up so the disadvantaged have space to speak, vent and state what they need and B) speak up within my advantaged group and share that message.

In discussions about a topic where I have a societal disadvantage, I need to remember my privileges will mitigate my experiences.   

It’s really that simple.  

~JJ

yxoque:

scientiststhesis:

So, since a lot of posts about anti-death and transhumanism are showing up on my wall, I figured I might pose a question.

Say humans transcend death/aging. What of the resource problem this creates? As a companion question to this, what of the other living things which would be burdened by our living for longer (e.g. forest animals that would face reduced habitable environments due to an increased need for resources on the part of humans)?

I’m not against transhumanism or anti-death views right now, I’m just curious how such things would be dealt with if we did “beat” death. 

Have a great Earth Day! :)

There are a few relevant points to make about this.

The first is that even if that were a problem, it strikes me that the best word to describe the solution “just let some people die to keep environmental and populational balance” is, well, “unacceptable.” Sure, it may be hard to solve, but from that it doesn’t follow that we shrug our shoulders and just say, “Oh, well. Guess thousands of people will have to continue dying daily after all.” Which brings me to my other points.

The second is that, as it is, we have resources to support a population that’s larger than the current one, and the only reason we have things like hunger is we’re fuck inefficient at it.

The third is that the overpopulation problem is still a problem even if people keep dying. We’re consuming resources at an unsustainable rate, and that’s a problem we’d have to deal with whether people are dying or not.

The fourth is that transhumanists aren’t only concerned with using technology to extend human life, technology is also supposed to augment the quality of that life. This implies that we’ll want to develop e.g. nanotechnology which will be able to manufacture the resources we need, balance the ecosystem, guarantee sustainable resource production, and make my fifth point much easier to accomplish:

Space colonisation. It’s fairly sad to suppose that we will want to live forever trapped in this tiny rock! I, for one, want to visit Alpha Centauri at least once in my life!

More thorough answers can be found at the Humanity+ Transhumanist FAQ and some other texts I’ve seen floating around on the internet (including iirc a video by Julia Galef?). But the Transhumanist FAQ is the only one that comes directly to mind, so do check it out!

Would this happen to be the video you’re looking for?

Yes it would! Thanks :)

afoggydew:

So, since a lot of posts about anti-death and transhumanism are showing up on my wall, I figured I might pose a question.

Say humans transcend death/aging. What of the resource problem this creates? As a companion question to this, what of the other living things which would be burdened by…

Once again, I would just like to preface by saying that I’m against neither transhumanism nor anti-death views. I’m just interested in exploring the consequences of such views and how such consequences might be dealt with.

You are actually quite right that we do have the resources to sustain a population greater than the one we have. Some estimates say that, with regards to food alone, we produce right now two or three times as much food as is necessary to feed the world - the issue is that the places that are starving are starving because they don’t have the economic means to bring food to them, or to grow it themselves.

My issue is that there is certainly an upper limit to how much food we can produce. There are limits to the availability of fresh water, the availability of arable land, the availability of the variety of metals we use on a daily basis, et cetera. Which means that your fifth point becomes incredibly important: if we want to sustain a population of people that can live indefinitely, we more or less have to be able to colonize other planets. 

What if that’s simply not feasible? There is no reason to believe that we will reach FTL travel - sure, we’ve surpassed limits that were said to be “impossible” before, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that we’ll be able to beat the light speed limit eventually. If we really can’t achieve feasible space travel due to physical limits, how do we deal with that in the context of transhumanism? Would it be necessary to impose an artifical limit on lifespan, or a limit on how many people can live on Earth at once? 

I’ve always been a huge scifi geek, and I personally love the idea of space travel. But I’m a realist as much as I’m an idealist, and it may never be truly feasible to achieve space travel beyond our solar system - which puts a significant limit on our resources if we want to sustain a population of immortals. 

And my concern with regards to resources goes beyond just how sustainable transhumanism is. Just saying that we’ll balance the ecosystem isn’t really enough to me. Even assuming we became vastly more efficient at collecting and distributing food, we’d still require vastly more land and organic resources in order to support a growing and everliving population - land and organic resources which are taken away from other organisms. I don’t know that I necessarily think that our desire to beat death puts us in a position where we can rightly say fuck it and turn the Earth into a veritable machine for sustaining the human population, when there’s literally millions of other types of organisms on Earth who would be harmed by that.

Well, as for your last point, I… personally care more about a single human being than about the entire population of cheetahs in the world. So um. I personally would not have a moral problem with turning the Earth into a thing to support humanity if that was absolutely necessary.

However, as for Space Colonisation, there’s no reason why we should limit ourselves to the Solar System just because FTL is impossible. Sure, we may not be able to reach Alpha Centauri within 100 years, but man we’re immortal we can just wait 1,000 years.

Not only that, but if that’s what it takes - travelling at sub-lightspeed and waiting it out -, we don’t need to live like the people in Wall-E, forced to be trapped “in a spaceship.” We can just upload our minds to a virtual environment and live in it - see each other, reproduce, etc - while we wait for our ship to arrive somewhere habitable, and then we poke our heads out and continue our life in the new place.

I think the moral of the story is: we’ll manage. Assuming from the start it isn’t possible is not a constructive/beneficial/healthy attitude. The one we should take is that until we are faced with incontrovertible guarantee that it’s absolutely impossible under all circumstances to do it, we should still try.

(Source: scientiststhesis)